Press Release_Wild Horse Education: Sheldon

Although horses were on the land we call the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge prior to the Refuge getting it’s designation, and before the passage of the Federal Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act, they have no enforceable protections. These wild horses are fair game for slaughter.

In 2006 a roundup occurred on public land that rocked the wild horse advocate community. In the sweltering sun of June, during foaling season, bands were stampeded through the desert with disastrous consequence.

Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge (US Fish and Wildlife, USFWS) had their specially screened contractors poised and ready to take horses and the contractors would receive $300.00 a head for each horse they removed from the range. The public was assured that gathers are safe and not done during foaling season. Yet extreme measures were taken to attempt to hide all activity from the public. Police were hired, gates were installed and a two-mile distance was then established as a barrier to hide actions from the public. Cattoor, the company that flies the helicopters, took to the air.

USFWS announced that the roundup had gone off safely. They reported one injury involving a lip.

However reports began to come in from those in the field of the various deceptions. Those listening to radio transmissions during the gather heard talk of a horse that broke a leg and was shot. A ground search began that turned up dead and injured foals, some of them bound and left in the desert. Mares in the gather pens aborted.

The contractors were paid $300. per head as they removed truckloads of horses from the range. Two of the three contractors had slaughterhouse connections and the unbranded horses coming off of public land ended up in the kill pen.

This roundup became known as the “Sheldon Massacre.”

In 2009 I filed suit against the Department of Fish and Wildlife and the Department of Interior (Yes, they are under Dept. of Interior). In 2009 while the nations eyes were on the Pryor Mountains and the famed herd of the “Cloud” series by Ginger Kathrens, the horses from Sheldon disappeared again. The suit was based on the fact that contrary to the statements made by the Refuge horses from Sheldon had no protection when they left the range. USFWS is not mandated to manage horses and burros with the same “protections” granted in the Wild Free Roaming horse and burro act of 1971.The horses and burros leave with no freeze mark, microchip or any way to identify them as wild horses, with tragic consequence.

That suit was on the verge of becoming “moot” as Sheldon NWR signed an agreement with the Bureau of Land management to include Sheldon NWR in the “mega-complex” that included wild horse areas in three states. Grandiose statements were made by Winnemmucca BLM district manager Gene Seidlitz and Paul Steblien of Sheldon about actual management of “ wild herds across the landscape.” Those claims included studying migratory patterns and genetic viability.

I was to be included in range studies occurring at the Complex. Gene Seidlitz did an amazing rendition of the sidestep and the only documentation I received was the 2008 BLM in-house report on Assessment, Inventory and Management. That document is basically a self-study in the ineptness of and lack of data used within the Bureau’s management of public land. Useful, but not a “cooperative” toward data compilation.

The suit was dropped as it would have needed to be re-crafted and re-filed. The support for the suit was practically non-existent from the public as other more publicized actions were occurring. But in the process I made a friend. Attorney Gordon Cowan of Reno wrote off the rest of the bill and remained interested in the issue of wild herds and public land.

Last year, as I was returning from Twin Peaks to head to Reno to prepare documents for the First Amendment Lawsuit (BLM, Silver King) with attorney Cowan, I got a call from Katie Fite (Western Watersheds). She believed there might be a roundup occurring at Sheldon without public notice. Leslie Peeples, another “drive alone with your dog on public land gal.” I informed her of the situation as I could not go. Leslie went.

Her trip uncovered that indeed there was a roundup without public notice. Paul Steblien, now retired manager of Sheldon, confirmed that the action was taken in order to avoid public scrutiny. Her trip also uncovered photos of the “bone pit” at Sheldon. Bones were strewn about in what appeared to be a careless manner, “As if their deaths did not matter,” according to Peeples.

Bone trail to the pit (Leslie Peeples)

A few of the horses taken were fortunate and made their way to Carr’s of Tennessee, but the rest remain unaccounted for. How many were left vulnerable, and shipped, to slaughter?

No access was given to view the roundup.

It is going to happen again.

The Bureau of Land Management roundup schedule has a gap in it. During that gap the contractors, Cattoor, will be at Sheldon. It has been confirmed.

An Environmental Assessment for another winter roundup at Calico Tri-state Complex (new name for the “mega-plex”) is in draft form and open for public comment until July 18, 2011.

How is it possible that in an area where there claims to be “management across the landscape”  that a part of the agreed upon area is not subject to the same review? How is it that horses can be rounded up from one section of the Complex and the action not mentioned in the document the public is supposed to comment on? How can horses from one section of this Complex be rounded up and protected by the mandates of Congress and horses from another section leave the range with no real protection from slaughter under law?

How is this in anyway a managed “Complex” for horses and burros that they recognize historically cross the border? One day the horse is on one side of a Federal boundary and protected and the next day on the other side and vulnerable to slaughter?

Is “management across the landscape” just another way of saying “wipe out the landscape?” It would certainly seem so.

Will the EA for public comment on Calico be revised to reflect the removal of horses from the Northern section of the Complex? It has yet to be determined.

Will these agencies ever manage horses in an honest effort to maintain a genetically viable herd on public land? It has yet to be determined.

Will we be given public access to observe? It has yet to be determined.

But if a chopper flies at Sheldon, I’ll be there. Sheldon is very close to my heart. When I die I want to go to Sheldon, as long as there are horses left there.

These horses will not leave public land without the public knowing what happens to them again.

~~ Laura Leigh’s field work is supported through and her Litigation efforts through

Band Stallion (Leigh)


Press Release Wild Horse Education: Broken Arrow

Looks like this horse tried to get the tag off_Broken Arrow 6-3-2011

On June 3, 2011 the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) gave the public an hour and a half wagon ride through the Broken Arrow (aka Indian Lakes facility) in Fallon Nevada. Closed for about a year, this is the first glimpse the public has had behind these walls since the BLM claimed the facility was never intended to be open to the public. Then they closed the doors after public outrage over images taken at the facility caused an influx of calls and emails.

In an email dated 5/25/2011 requesting that the doors of the facility be closed to the public Dean Bolstad of the BLM Reno office writes:

We now have a favorable Calico Court decision and we need to seriously consider the toll that these tours are taking on our employees, our resources and the damage that is being done to BLMs image as a result of the tours.”

The facility was not closed because it can not be open to the public. The facility was closed because they did not like the publics response. Further investigation also has revealed that the contract for the facility actually allows for weekly public tours.

This past winter horses died in that facility. Horses continue to die. Respiratory infection ran rampant in the facility this past winter as horses were stockpiled behind the iron bars out of sight of a public that would have seen the results of roundups that occur in sub-zero temperatures.

During the tour you saw a facility that was well prepared for the “tour.” A wagon pulled by a pick-up truck where a representative of the BLM sat in the cab, available only at brief intervals for questions. Hospital pens were off limits. Horses from various roundups were mixed and no individuals could be identified as the tour did not stop long enough and visitors were not allowed to walk through the facility.

“Content control” was an effective, if illegal, tool to keep the public uneducated about the realities of the mis-management of America’s National Treasure.

A lawsuit filed by Plaintiff Laura Leigh has gone to the Ninth Circuit Court. The suit filed by attorney Gordon Cowan of Reno deals with the issues of “content control” as a violation of First Amendment Rights guaranteed by the Constitution of The United States. The suit directly deals with this issue in the management of wild herds from range through their ultimate disposition.

The suit is supported by Wild Horse Education, a registered non-profit in the state of Nevada. All documents mentioned are viewable on the website:

Lawsuit: Update

Hospital Area Broken Arrow (Indian Lakes) Calico Complex Horses 1/2010 (Leigh)

The battle to see our horses continues, as horses continue to die behind closed doors

Wild Horse Education is continuing the legal battle for transparency against the Department of Interior (DOI) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). Because the public is continually denied consistent access to roundups and holding facilities that house the American public’s wild horses, taken from public land with public funds, this action is gaining increasing importance.

On February 14, 2011 Plaintiff Laura Leigh filed for permission to appeal her First Amendment Rights case against the BLM to the Ninth Circuit Court. Her plea was based on the fact that there had been no ruling by the Federal Court in Reno to her request for Emergency Injunctive Relief in a case she had filed five months previous. Her request cited that “no action” in a case requiring emergency relief was an essential denial of her motion.

Judge Larry Hicks of the Federal District Court in Reno has now denied Leigh’s motion as “moot.” However in his ruling he does allow written testimony to stand in the record that had been objected to by the BLM.

“Basically this is good news,” said Leigh “What the Judge has now given me is an opportunity to present this case without first going through the process of gaining the Court’s permission. He has also ruled that the entire record of the case remains intact and that is vital to demonstrate the repetitive behavior that has precedent in higher Courts as not moot.”

Leigh has spent the last year observing more roundups than any government personnel and bringing the public daily reports. The suit she brought earlier last year, to the same Court over closure of public land and a roundup during the heat of summer for the Owyhee Herd Management Area, bore fruit for public observers. That suit found that closure of public land was a prior restraint to First Amendment Rights, creating the beginning of a daily observation platform for the public.

“The current suit is NOT about observing a single roundup,” Leigh stated “The emergency relief requested extends to the repetitive battle for observation. We have a right to know how our money is spent in the hands-on management of our horses throughout the process. From roundup through holding and their ultimate disposition, wherever that may be, it is our right to see it.”

This winter horses from the Eagle Complex joined those named in Leigh’s suit from the Silver King Herd Management Area behind the locked doors of the BLM Indian Lakes (Broken Arrow) facility in Fallon Nevada. Horses continue to die and suffer disease out of sight of public scrutiny. Horses in that facility continue to die at an alarming rate as indicated in the weekly reports.

Last spring the BLM closed the doors of the facility, which had previously offered weekly public tours, because of the intensity of public outrage. In an email from Dean Bolstad, of the Nevada state office in Reno to his superiors, dated May 25 of last year he writes: “The impact of stopping the tours pales in comparison to the impact to our employees and BLM’s image.”

Is this a reason to deny the public basic rights guaranteed in the Constitution? Or is this a reason to “clean up your act?”

The full Appeal is expected to be filed by Leigh and her attorney Gordon Cowan of Reno soon.

The legal efforts are supported solely by Wild Horse Education, a registered non-profit in the state of Nevada.


Laura Leigh

 Personal Note: This suit has been a tremendous effort. You can ask anyone that has travelled with me how many hours I spend researching and crafting documents. Researching and collecting evidence and data in the field daily. The “concept of law” in this country is a complex process and the learning curve is steep.

Yet historically the evidence points to the fact that documentation and exposure changed practices that occured in the past. Documentation is creating a broader base of exposure throughout the world for what America is doing to it’s own symbol of Freedom.

We need to push this program into the light. The closed door facilities need to open. Meaningful observation MUST be allowed at roundups and facilities.

But I need your help. Support this action that benefits YOUR right to know.

Catching up…


December 16, 2010



Two briefs were recently filed in the ongoing lawsuit brought by journalist Laura Leigh against the Bureau of Land Management and Department of Interior. The briefs are in connection with the Silver King wild horse roundups conducted in Nevada this past September. The case pursues the public‟s ongoing right to accountability on the whereabouts of these horses after capture.

Leigh‟s suit champions the public‟s and her own right to reasonable access to observe all aspects of the government‟s handling of the wild horses taken from the Silver King herd management area near Ely, Nevada. This lawsuit is based 100% on violations to First Amendment rights. It directly challenges, the Defendants‟ unconstitutional prior restraints on the Plaintiff‟s First Amendment rights by denying her reasonable access to wild horse roundups and related activities, to observe and report on all activities from capture, removal, processing, shipping, transportation, housing, and ultimate disposition of wild horses taken during the Silver King wild horse roundup operations (which the BLM euphemistically refers to as a “gather”).

Following hours of testimony November 16 when Judge Hicks heard Leigh‟s evidence against the BLM and Dept. of Interior, the judge agreed to allow the parties to submit additional briefs including a supplemental brief from the plaintiff as an offer of proof of the testimony and other evidence the judge refused from evidence at the hearing.

Justice Department attorneys for the BLM argued that since the roundup had already occurred, the case was mooted. Leigh‟s attorney, Gordon Cowan, argued, “[the mere cessation of illegal activity in response to pending litigation does not moot a case, unless the party alleging mootness can show that the „allegedly wrongful behavior could not reasonably be expected to recur.‟” Much case law was cited where other courts upheld Cowan‟s argument. One court concluded that, without such an exception to „mootness‟ the courts would be compelled to leave the, “defendant … free to return to his old ways.”

Conduct by the BLM at the Twin Peaks roundup in Twin Peaks CA was cited. On August 24, 2010 a New York Times reporter and photographer were allowed directly into the horse capture trap during the moment of wild horse captures. At that exact same time, Laura Leigh‟s press credentials were not being recognized by the defendants‟ officials there; and she was precluded from having access to the trap area and held back nearly a half-mile from the trap. On this same day, Laura Leigh was not allowed to walk on public land to a public road to photograph horses leaving the traps after they had been captured and loaded onto a trailer. When standing in the identical area where other members of the public were allowed to freely pass to and from their cars to the viewing area, Ms. Leigh was instructed to move and go back to the viewing area; that if she refused, it could elevate to the “next level,” which she was advised by defendants, meant she could be arrested. Many almost identical scenarios are repeated at previous and subsequent roundups attended by Laura Leigh and her press credentials from Horseback Magazine for whom she reports, are routinely denied.

Cowan‟s brief also contends the complaint is not moot where it seeks Injunctive relief to gain immediate access to horses being warehoused in facilities closed to the public, and to have the public and press observe these horses not just during their capture, but at all stages of their journey through the BLM‟s wild horse removal program.

Leigh was precluded from providing evidence that mootness didn‟t apply. The judge would not allow evidence of the BLM‟s conduct occurring elsewhere such as the closing to the public of the Indian Lakes horse holding facility. Prior to Indian Lakes‟ closure (in June) public tours of the facility were given weekly. Leigh and colleagues photographed and videoed difficult images from these tours, including images of a foal nearly starved to death, an eight month old colt dying because his feet were damaged from a recent roundup, horses with abscesses apparently suffering from pigeon fever, and other tough images. BLM‟s Dean Bolstad, according to the brief, complained to Leigh over the barrage of emails he received from displeased citizens who viewed the published Indian Lakes images.

Injured baby at PVC (how many at Broken Arrow?)

BLM‟s Bolstad sent an email to superiors arguing that “Indian Lakes” should close to the public because of the, “damage that is being done to BLM‟s image as a result of the tours.” This offensive email is attached to Leigh‟s brief. The brief also conveys that Bolstad at one point called Ms. Leigh a terrorist simply because she published her photos taken at Indian Lakes.

All subsequent requests to reopen the facility to the public have since been denied, according to Leigh‟s court filing. Since then no horses removed from Silver King who were taken to “Indian Lakes” facility were seen by the public since before their capture on the range. Even members of the public interested in adopting a Silver King horse from “Indian Lakes” would be denied access to view the horse. Horses are moved from “Indian Lakes” to long term holding and the public never has a chance to view them again.

On December 11, 2010 Leigh‟s counsel filed a brief responsive to the Defendant‟s brief that sought to strike or limit the testimony accepted in evidence at the November hearing. The defendants complained they were prejudiced when not notified that the hearing would be evidentiary in nature. The BLM also claimed to have experienced difficulty obtaining copies of Leigh‟s filed witness list from the court‟s electronic document management system. The defendants sought to have all testimony stricken.

Following a thorough brow-beating over the defendants‟ contended “surprise” that evidence would be received at a scheduled hearing, Cowan added, “To claim surprise or prejudice because the defendants were not prepared for an evidentiary Rule 65 hearing, under these circumstances, is entertaining at best.”

The BLM added a new argument to their existing repertoire of “mootness,” now claiming the complaint was somehow “vague”. Cowan argued, “this new „vagueness‟ argument seeks to steer the court astray into thinking the case should be embroiled in administrative proceedings or records which discuss challenges to the inhumanity of the defendants‟ wild horse removal and warehousing process.”

Wont forget you

Cowan in our estimation, “nailed it” when asserting the following:

Although the BLM and Interior Department‟s Wild Horse and Burro removal and warehousing process is one of America‟s greater embarrassing atrocities, this issue is not the focal point of the case. “Inhumanity” is, although ongoing with the BLM‟s “management” of America‟s wild horses, unfortunately, secondary. The case clearly seeks to challenge the defendants‟

continuing removal of interested citizens (not horses) from observing the defendants‟ handling of America‟s wild horses, particularly those horses that entered the defendants‟ process from Silver King.” These horses (Silver King horses in this instance) are being handled, processed, and/or disposed of, or moved, or “lost,” or warehoused even as of this writing. The process doesn‟t come to a halt just because the defendants completed their roundup. The process is ongoing. The roundup is only the beginning of the defendants‟ process. In this instance the defendants‟ process remains entirely secretive and hidden from the public‟s eye. In this instance, Silver King horses entered the process at the front end, beginning with the roundup. They (Silver King horses) are still there, somewhere, within the process, within the Defendants‟ wild horse handling system. There is not one document or notice from the defendants indicating that

all handling of Silver King horses has been concluded. Only the roundup stopped. No document or record of the defendants states or even implies that they (the defendants) have concluded all handling, processing and warehousing of Silver King horses. These First Amendment violations occur and are repeated each and every time Ms. Leigh or citizens are turned away, or refused access, or are kept back, or are denied appropriate observation, entrance or access to any portion of the defendants‟ processes. The most outrageous part of it all, is that the defendants continue on the same secretive, private course as if citizens possessed no right at all to observe the government in action. This is shameful.”

Trying to see Broken Arrow (film students)

Laura Leigh‟s legal actions are supported by Grass Roots Horse, Inc. an equine welfare and mustang advocacy group. The legal actions can be viewed at Field Reports on wild horse roundups and related information can be read at

*********Please be aware that “Indian Lakes” used to be called “Broken Arrow.” At first it was called “Fallon facilty.” This creates an issue where search engines do not pick up full history. It also creates an impression that there are more facilities.

Horses are dying there every week… that we will never see… Silver King, Twin Peaks, Callaghan…

Another day in Court

Judge Hicks has finally set a date for hearing on the emergency TRO filed over a month ago for access to the hands on management of our wild herds. The Contempt motion will also be heard on the same day.

 Say a prayer for Democracy

Two important lawsuits will be heard by Judge Larry Hicks in Reno, Nevada on November 16, 2010.One of the hearings will be on the Motion for Temporary and Injunctive Relief in the Silver King, NV wild horse round up filed by the Plaintiff, Laura Leigh against the Bureau of Land Management, Interior Dept. and the Nevada State Director of the BLM. The Plaintiff‟s Response to the court on BLM‟s responses to the Motion was filed on October 12, 2010.
This lawsuit is based 100% on violations to First Amendment rights. It directly challenges, the Defendants‟ unconstitutional prior restraints on the Plaintiff‟s First Amendment rights by denying her reasonable access to wild horse roundups and related activities, to observe and report on all activities from capture, removal, processing, shipping, transportation, housing, and ultimate disposition of wild horses taken during the Silver King wild horse roundup operations (which the BLM euphemistically refers to as “gathers”). Laura Leigh, is a journalist and videographer whose work on wild horse issues has garnered her international attention.
“All I am trying to do is bring to the public a comprehensive story on the hands-on management of this National Treasure,” says Leigh “The difficulties I have had are absurd in a Democratic society.”

The government is basically controlling the content of what information reaches the public by precluding journalists who may portray them in an unflattering light.

The Second hearing will be on the (filed) August 11, 2010 Motion on Contempt of Court charges levied against the BLM which cites evidence of the Defendants‟ violation of the court‟s previous order to uphold the plaintiff‟s First Amendment Rights to observe and report on the Bureau of Land Management in regard to the “gather” and removal of wild horses in Owyhee Herd Management Area. When Laura Leigh arrived in Owyhee, accompanied by two individuals, they were barred entrance to the roundup site, stopped by armed personnel on public land, and given the literal run around.

The Contempt of Court Motion also addresses the Defendants‟ sworn testimony in open court that a „water emergency‟ existed and that an „emergency‟ roundup had to happen immediately, or horses would die. This testimony resulted in Judge Larry Hicks lifting the Temporary Restraining Order he had put in place to halt the Owyhee gather until he could hear legal arguments in the case.

Photos and documentation of the area have been filed showing that in fact the range appears exactly the same as it normally does this time of year, and nothing out of the ordinary was found by independent observation.

“Federal Judges have a tough job and a tight schedule,” said  council Gordon Cowan, “Our country is based on very sound principals that ensure democracy continues and our case will be heard.”


The Silence of the Foals and Journalists


Gordon Cowan (photo by Melinda Cowan)

RENO, – The BLM is escalating removal of wild horses from western rangelands in epic numbers. Thirteen thousand horses will be removed just this year. Flawed data and ulterior motive drive their purpose. Blanket closures, deception and restrictions hide their brutal enterprise.

With journalists excluded, their public relations prowess spins favorable accounts from horrendous failures.

It’s called the “Owyhee Slaughter.” Thirty-four wild horses perished in northeastern Nevada this July in a BLM roundup. The BLM blamed dry range conditions.

It started when the BLM told a federal judge if his injunction against the roundup continued, 75 percent of the Owyhee herd would die for lack of water. This bleak testimony formed the basis for the judge to lift the injunction.

But, something was awry. The BLM managed the area exclusively. They planned the roundup months in advance while never forecasting this emergency.

When the BLM vacated Owyhee after the roundup concluded, independent range experts were eager to see firsthand what caused the emergency. Contrary to BLM court testimony, they found water and lots of it.

It’s a disturbing process. The BLM uses helicopters to push herds several miles. Horses are panic driven over difficult terrain in midsummer heat. New foals, their moms and pregnant mares are among those pursued. Oftentimes they don’t survive. Resultantly, the BLM excludes journalists to discourage their reporting to the public of what transpires behind closed doors.

When Congress in 1971 proclaimed their protected status, wild horses became America’s newest native citizens. When Congress entrusted their welfare in part to the BLM, the assignment posed a conflict where the BLM’s role as “property manager” competes with the horses’ best interests.

The BLM caters to private interests who use considerable areas of public land to extract non-renewable resources. To make room for these private concerns the BLM eliminates wild horses from the landscape, giving little credence to their iconic and protected status.

Despite massive land holdings the BLM chooses slivers of private property on which to capture horses. They contend private property is safer than public lands for horse roundups. With traps on private property, the BLM engages local authorities who threaten arrest should citizens trespass to sneak a peek. This allows the BLM to conduct their brutal enterprise under a blanket of secrecy.

How far did the BLM go to prevent public observation of the Owyhee Slaughter? In July horse journalist Laura Leigh and two friends sought to document the BLM’s herd removal. Anxious moments prevailed as BLM officials converged on the women before they reached the trap zone.

Three BLM officials and a sheriff’s deputy stood ground in a desolate region on the dirt road. Reminiscent of the Clantons and Earps, the women were blocked from traveling further. The men said don’t trespass. The women inquired. The men drew the figurative “private property” line in the sand. The women held cameras. The men packed guns. Tensions peaked when a BLM official shoved back a camera lens.

The women retreated, fearful of arrest from venturing beyond undefined property boundaries. It all occurred on public lands on a public road in violation of a judge’s order prohibiting closures.

Earlier, Ms. Leigh sought judicial help to postpone the BLM’s helicopter roundup to a time when foals were more sturdy and when temperatures cooled. She asserted First Amendment notions because the BLM’s land closure was a censorship of her right to observe and report government activity.

When the entourage of Washington, D.C. lawyers descended on Reno to defend Leigh’s claims, her counsel offered to forego suit if the BLM would postpone the roundups and allow public access. The BLM refused. The case proceeded.

Two federal judges agreed with Leigh’s right to observe government in action. Judge Hicks dissolved the BLM’s blanket closure, labeling it a First Amendment “prior restraint,” meaning, “censorship” of a free press. The second, a noted jurist, conveyed this:

“The Press was protected so that it could bare the secrets of the government and inform the people. Only a free and unrestrained press can effectively expose deception in government. And paramount among the responsibilities of a free press is the duty to prevent any part of the government from deceiving the people.” Hugo Black, 1971

What’s next? The BLM is back to “business as usual,” playing the “shell game” with roundup dates, closing public lands, censoring speech and killing good horses. If they can’t be stopped, America should be prepared to say goodbye to the last living symbol of the spirit of the west, the wild, free-roaming horse.

Author Bio:  Gordon Cowan is a veteran civil litigator in Nevada who challenged the Interior Department’s news blackout of the brutal Owyhee roundup. Mr. Cowan raises horses, works with cattle, is a cutting horse enthusiast and a past president of a top rodeo in North America.  His work on the ongoing issues of the First Amendment are supported by Wild Horse Education, Ms. Leigh Nevada non-profit.

Editor’s Note: Mr. Cowan successfully won the right in federal court for press and public to observe BLM activies on public land. Since that time the agency has flagrantly violated the court order. He is now attempting to get BLM held in contempt.

Personal note: I’d like you all to meet my attorney.

If you can support our effort go to:

If you can support our effort go to: