Press Release Wild Horse Education: Broken Arrow

Looks like this horse tried to get the tag off_Broken Arrow 6-3-2011

On June 3, 2011 the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) gave the public an hour and a half wagon ride through the Broken Arrow (aka Indian Lakes facility) in Fallon Nevada. Closed for about a year, this is the first glimpse the public has had behind these walls since the BLM claimed the facility was never intended to be open to the public. Then they closed the doors after public outrage over images taken at the facility caused an influx of calls and emails.

In an email dated 5/25/2011 requesting that the doors of the facility be closed to the public Dean Bolstad of the BLM Reno office writes:

We now have a favorable Calico Court decision and we need to seriously consider the toll that these tours are taking on our employees, our resources and the damage that is being done to BLMs image as a result of the tours.”

The facility was not closed because it can not be open to the public. The facility was closed because they did not like the publics response. Further investigation also has revealed that the contract for the facility actually allows for weekly public tours.

This past winter horses died in that facility. Horses continue to die. Respiratory infection ran rampant in the facility this past winter as horses were stockpiled behind the iron bars out of sight of a public that would have seen the results of roundups that occur in sub-zero temperatures.

During the tour you saw a facility that was well prepared for the “tour.” A wagon pulled by a pick-up truck where a representative of the BLM sat in the cab, available only at brief intervals for questions. Hospital pens were off limits. Horses from various roundups were mixed and no individuals could be identified as the tour did not stop long enough and visitors were not allowed to walk through the facility.

“Content control” was an effective, if illegal, tool to keep the public uneducated about the realities of the mis-management of America’s National Treasure.

A lawsuit filed by Plaintiff Laura Leigh has gone to the Ninth Circuit Court. The suit filed by attorney Gordon Cowan of Reno deals with the issues of “content control” as a violation of First Amendment Rights guaranteed by the Constitution of The United States. The suit directly deals with this issue in the management of wild herds from range through their ultimate disposition.

The suit is supported by Wild Horse Education, a registered non-profit in the state of Nevada. All documents mentioned are viewable on the website:http://WildHorseEducation.org

Dr. Kane, BLM DVM?

Reprint from Horseback Online

The Big Story

Unlicensed Vet Working Nevada Gather Where 113 Horses Have Died or Have Been Miscarried

By Steven Long

Photo by Laura Leigh

HOUSTON, (Horseback) – A government veterinarian working for the Bureau of Land Management in its Nevada office has treated horses there without a state license.

At least 113 captured horses have either died or been miscarried after a grueling chase by helicopter over rocky mountain land in the dead of winter.

Horseback Magazine confirmed late Monday in a check with the Nevada Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners that there is no record of a veterinary license for Dr. Albert Kane. Last month the magazine sought the vitae of the veterinarian but the BLM refused to supply it.

Kane is a Veterinary Medical Officer with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Animal Health Policy and Programs staff. In this position he serves as a staff veterinarian and advisor for the BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program, according to spokeswoman JoLynn Worley.

“Dr. Kane doesn’t have a current bio or CV available at this time and has declined to prepare one specifically at your request,” Worley said at the time.

After the refusal to respond to the magazine’s request for Kane’s credentials, a request for that information under the Freedom of Information Act was filed. Thus far there has been no BLM compliance on the FOIA.

The 113 dead horses came from BLM’s Calico Wild Horse Management Area in Northern Nevada. The “gather” was a tightly controlled operation in which press and public was held in a viewing area far from the actual roundup and helicopter driven stampede.

Horses captured in the operation are now held in the BLM’s Fallon processing facility.

Horseback Magazine has now asked the BLM if Kane is licensed elsewhere other than in Nevada.

The Fallon facility is under tight control with press and public barred from observing horse processing in other than rare and brief media days and observation opportunities.

Opponents of the gathers have charged that the government agency is rendering America’s wild horse herds genetically bankrupt on its 260 million acres of mostly vacant land.

Last year, in a 68 page document titled “Alternative Management Options” the BLM discussed killing thousands of wild horses. It also addressed the issue of neutering horses in enormous numbers.

Interior Secretary Ken Salazar, a former rancher, has proposed that thousands of horses be sent to seven holding areas in the Midwest and East as tourist attractions. The proposal has been ridiculed by equine welfare activists as “Salazoos.”

Fallon Update

Mare at the BLM facility in Fallon

Calico Complex Update

On February 18, 2010, while advocates were protesting in Las Vegas, the Bureau of land management began the processing of wild horses gathered from the Calico Complex Herd Management Area. Horses held at the Broken Arrow, a private holding facility, began to be aged, vaccinated, branded, etc. in preperation for adoption, sale and moves to long-term facilities. (BLM Fallon facility update here.)

John Neill, acting BLM manager of the facility, said mares are being processed first.

“We have prepped approx. 300 hd to date.Preparation is concentrated primarily on the mares at themoment, as we need to complete the preparation process with them before they begin to foal. Once preparation is completed with the mares, we will concentrate on the weanlings/yearlings…………which have already been vaccinated. Stallions will be prepped after mares, weanlings/yearlings. I do not have an exact date when this will take place The entire preparation process of the calico animals should take approx. 8 weeks.”

Horse Advocate Marilyn Wargo had some specific questions for the BLM:

“It would help all our perceptions if we had a schedule that reflects the work all involved at the Fallon facility are actually doing on a daily basis, weekly, etc. I would like to think the horses are central to activity and not just on some days. Everyday. How many people work there and what are their jobs? How often are horses fed and are their water tanks cleaned out regular to keep down infectious disease?”

Reply by John Neill:


“There are 3-4 experienced wranglers and a veterinarian present during the
preparation process. On average 60-70 animals are prepped/day. There are days where other activities may take place along with prep. to ensure
animal care. The facility contractor has sufficient personnel to feed and
maintain the facility. Horses are currently being fed free choice
grass/alfalfa hay. Once all animals have adjusted to dietary changes the
feeding regime will be adjusted. Typically 20lbs/day/adult to maintain
good health. Younger animals typically receive 12-15lbs/day. Water troughs
are cleaned frequently. More often in the summer months as sunlight
promotes algae growth. Troughs are scrubbed with bleach for disinfection
when cleaning takes place.”

I asked if dates had been set for the horses going through adoption and through sale authority.

John Neill:

BLM does intend to hold an adoption event of Calico animals once preparation is complete and animals show no health issues. The adoption event will take place at Palomino Valley facility. There has been interest by other individuals on specific animals also. Most likely many of these that several persons have shown interest in will be posted on the I-net for competitive bidding. An adoption event date will be forthcoming once preparation is completed and animals show no signs of health issues.


Fallon Foal (edited timeline)

I have been getting a lot of questions about the foal that I witnessed at the Bureau of Land Management’s Fallon facility. Many of the questions I’m sent center around the chain of events surrounding the requests for information and the vet report. I hope this “fills in the blanks” for you.

Vet Report Request

On January 22 I was given a tour of the Bureau of Land Management’s Fallon holding facility in Nevada. The facility is still under construction but was used to warehouse the wild horse inventory gathered from the Calico Complex Herd Management Area. Awarding the contract to a private entity and having the facility constructed on private property has created a situation where viewing wild horse inventory by the public (that owns that inventory) must be achieved through strict appointment times and dates.

During that visit to the facility I viewed the hospital area. There were many horses (mostly foals) that all demonstrated some form of lameness. I viewed approximately a dozen foals and 4 mares. There was also one of the riding horses in a “hospital” pen. Of particular concern was a foal that would not rise when approached or vocalized to.

Many attempts were made to gain info on that foal and get him released into private care. The foal died.

The first attempt to gain info and care of the foal was made via voice mail to both Gene Seidlitz (Winnemucca district manager), sent 1/22 and John Neill (acting BLM manager at Fallon) sent 1/23. This e-mail basically documents the request, (e-mail excerpt to Seidlitz):

Today as we went through the “hospital” area, (another thank-you here for allowing that visit) there was the one foal I was most concerned about. The others stood and moved away from me, this guy just raised his head. I mentioned to John the concern and do recognize the added stress isolating this youngster would bring. However, if he makes it through the night I know of two prior BLM adopters (with orphan foal experience) in close proximity that would head out with a trailer, pick him up, and take on the expense of his care… with 15 minutes notice.

I know that there is specific protocol, but perhaps in this instance it could be sped up?

Picture attached to e-mail

I received a phone call from John Neill the day after I e-mailed him. This e-mail documents that call (in part):

Thanks for calling me with the update on the foal.

When you get that vet report I’d really appreciate seeing a copy asap as we discussed.

I’d like to know what the vet thinks about his prognosis.

I’m still very concerned and can get that foal additional care if it is required, (allowed).

Two days later (January 26) another telephone call occurred. I was reassured the foal was still doing fine.

Thanks for calling me with the update on the foal.

When you get that vet report I’d really appreciate seeing a copy asap as we discussed.

I’d like to know what the vet thinks about his prognosis.

I’m still very concerned and can get that foal additional care if it is required, (allowed).

I was on the road and had conversations with John Neill in reference to the foal.

I was repeatedly informed of his improved status and continued to ask he be “tracked” for adoption. I repeatedly asked for vet report.

On February 1, I made another call to John Neill to request the vet report.

“It’s online, (It wasn’t). He was euthanized Friday or Saturday for hoof slough.” John Neill.

Several more requests for the report were made. More e-mail and conversation. This is an excerpt from an e-mail from John Neill dated 2/4:

Attached is a vet report for sloughed hoofs foal. This report should be

posted on the web as I was informed this would happen. The diagnosis in

this report covers a foal that was diagnosed, treated and euthanized

earlier for the same reasons. The dates will not jive with the foal you

are referring to. However, the diagnosis, treatment and outcome are the

same. We will not be posting detailed vet reports for every treatment to

specific animals received.

My response, in part:

This is a very different response you gave to my first request for information. Saturday the 23rd the vet was out with the foal and I asked for a report. You said you would send it as soon as it was available.

When I asked to place him in a facility we had a conversation about not wanting to further traumatize by transport. We then had a conversation where you informed me there were no signs of abscess and the foal was doing fine. I then requested that if his condition changed to please let me know and I would place him in a facility at private expense. I was told you would keep me posted. And if he was in bad shape would “try.”

Releasing that foal was not impossible. I beleive the BLM site posted another foal was to be released for care, an orphan.

I then said I would FOIA the report if needed.

On 2/5 I received an e-mail from Dean Bolstad  (who was added to the e-mail chain by John Neill) that the report would be available on Monday.

On 2/8:

Laura,

Attached is the requested veterinarian report. I’m sending it to you for

John Neill.

(See attached file: Veterinarian Report_Weanling Colt 2-6-2010.pdf)

The report:

February 6, 2010

History and Report on Sloughed Hoof Colt

An eight month old colt arrived at the Indian Lakes Facility on about 1/20/2010

and was in very poor body condition and had sore feet.  It was placed in the sick

pen area where treatment could be administered.  Over the next ten days, the

colt was treated with phenylbutazone (a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug),

penicillin (an antibiotic) and foot bandages (one front foot and both hind feet) on

three occasions before it was euthanized on 1/30/2010.

The colt alternately improved and regressed.  The colt would be standing while

eating and drinking one day and not on the next day.  The colt never was able to

actually gain weight, improve body condition or show increased energy.

Lameness improved with treatment but eventually the colt became too weak to

stand.  Hoof wall separation occurred on the front foot and one hind foot.  The

colt was euthanized for humane reasons.

The gather most likely caused the hoof trauma in this case.  However, the poor

body condition and weakness was most likely present before the gather.

Richard Sanford, DVM

NV # 565

The above is the “complete” vet report on the foal. It has no identifying points. It lists no markings, location, not even a specified intake date. The above report shows no dates of treatment nor does it list the foals’ status on any specified date.

There is no way to determine which foal is even in that report. The foal I saw on the 22nd of January looked like a candidate for humane euthanasia that night. The foal limping with  bandages on his feet (photo below) looks like he may have lasted another week. The lack of specific tracking at the holding facility leaves one with a real sick feeling that we will never really know the truth about how many die and how they die.

These two foals had bandages on their feet.

If you look at the photo (sent to BLM to identify the foal), there are no bandages on the foal’s feet. If you follow the e-mails and conversation that specific foal would have had all of the “treatment,” besides the bute, after 1/27, I was never told he warranted bandaging.

The listing of “poor body condition” and “weakness” is easily refuted by the video. It is also refuted by the fact that the foal ran so hard he caused trauma so severe to his feet that his hooves began to slough off. He ran so hard for miles, chased by a helicopter to stay with his family that he was immediately separated from at the trap site, that his feet eventually fell off. That is not a “weak” foal. The vague vet report has me seriously doubting the authenticity of any accurate accounting of the inventory at Fallon.The continued placation, spin and outright lies perpetuated by BLM personnel has me wondering if a dialogue will ever occur that simply deals with “what is” and “how do we fix it” in any fashion that resembles reason.

The death of this little foal has me sad beyond mere words.